Download Education After the Collapse Book for Free! Click on the book cover!

Education After the Collapse

PRESS RELEASE - Education After The Collapse

Doomsday Preppers Doesn't Represent Us! (For Non-Preppers)

DoomsdayPreppersSo, you were watching “The Crazies” on Doomsday Preppers and Googled “preppers” and arrived at Prepper Website…which brought you here (I try not to post on PW).

First, Doomsday Preppers is a TV show.  The producers need ratings.  If they don’t get ratings, they don’t continue to produce the show.  The best way to get ratings is to show a lot of crazy people doing stupid stuff for stupid reasons!

Preppers is a term to describe people who want to be prepared.  In reality, who doesn’t want to be prepared?  If a hurricane was coming to your city, would you not want to have some food at home, batteries to run flashlights and a generator to provide some power to your refrigerator so you don’t lose all that food?  If a wildfire was at the door of your nediborhood, wouldn’t you want to know what to do to minimize damage to your house?  If you lost your job, wouldn’t you want to be able to have a little cushion to survive without worrying about what you were going to eat and how you were going to pay your bills?

Preparedness is just common sense.  Preppers want to live a self-reliant life.  We choose to be responsible for our own lives and not dependent on the government to come and rescue us… remember Katrina?  remember Sandy?

Preparedness is how your great-grandparents lived.  They didn’t have 24 hour Walmarts to get whatever they wanted or needed.  They had to plan and think ahead.  Many of them would have never depended on the government for help unless it was a last resort!  They were a different generation!  We don’t want to go backwards, but we do want to live in the spirit of being responsible for ourselves.

Yes, there is some craziness out there.  But you will find craziness in every area of life.  When you involve people, you have the potential for extremes.

I challenge you to READ THIS and think about how prepared you are for an emergency.  You don’t have to be a rocket scientist to know that we are living in stressful times.  If you are doing the grocery shopping for your family, you know a little of what I mean!

If Doomsday Preppers does anything…I hope it will at least get you to think about taking responsibility for your life and not depending on some one else who may or MAY NOT be there.

Peace,
Todd
Owner/Editor of Prepper Website

 

For Preppers – This article was written because Prepper Website sees a dramatic jump in visitors on the nights that Doomsday Preppers airs.  I’m hoping to share with the non-prepper, the advantages of living a preparedness lifestyle.  Feel free to leave any good advice below.

TS

 

 

 

This article first appeared on Ed That Matters.

Get updates in your email when a new article is posted. Sign Up Here! Or grab the RSS Feed.

If you enjoyed the article, please vote for the site at Top Prepper Websites.

Copyright – Content on Ed That Matters (unless the work of a Third-Party) may be reproduced in part or whole with attribution through a link to www.edthatmatters.com. If you are interested in a Third Party article, please contact the author for permission.

Earthstraw


Pickup Truck Prepping?

tg2

Everything you can do right now to NOT be out money is smart! Every prepper should be watching his/her finances carefully and making good decisions, even if that decision is to spend a little now to save a LOT later!

My truck tailgate was stolen this past May. I know the exact date and I know the exact time frame of when it happened! It was Thursday, the 8th. I volunteered to work the district Technology Conference and then had to stop by the store to pick up some cookies for a thing we were having at school. When I pulled into my driveway, I remember looking at the clock in the truck and noticing that it was 8:45 p.m. It was a long day…and I still had to update Prepper Website.

In the morning, my son took out the trash to the street. When he came in, he asked me why I had taken off my tailgate. I looked at him and asked, “what are you talking about?” He said, “your tailgate is not on your truck.” I went out to look and noticed that it was gone. It was 5:45 a.m.

I learned that it takes about 30 seconds to take off a tailgate. It just lifts off! How stupid is that???  Watch the video below.  It takes the jerk more time to park and lift up his truck bed cover than to lift off the tailgate!

 

I filed a police report for the insurance and asked the officer if there were more thefts reported in the neighborhood. He said that he doesn’t get called out to my neighborhood very often. So, I figure that someone targeted my truck. I’ve come to this conclusion because it is hard to get a used one!

The replacement cost $2900. That included purchasing the tailgate, putting it together, emblems, matching the paint job and spray-in bed liner. Luckily, I didn’t have to pay that. I just had to pay my deductible. But still, it is money that I wish I didn’t have to spend.

I contemplated not replacing the tailgate. I was eying a tailgate net on Amazon. But, I wasn’t sure about the holes. And, I guess you don’t realize how much you really use the tailgate until you don’t have one.

A positive thing that came out of this experience is that the new tailgate has a lock on it. For some reason, the stolen tailgate didn’t have a lock on it. In talking with the insurance rep., it should have.

The insurance rep. also told me about a cheap aftermarket item that you can put on your truck that, if you forget to lock your gate, makes it difficult for a thief to steal your tailgate.

I purchased the McGard Tailgate lock at my local auto parts store. The lock is basically a “hose clamp” type mechanism that requires a special key lock to loosen and tighten. The key is only used to install the lock and then you put it up for safe keeping. The lock does not impede the ability to open or close the tailgate one bit.  But it does stop anyone from being able to lift off the tailgate without first removing the lock!

tg3

I purchased the McGard lock for $26. Amazon sells it for $19. It took me about 5 minutes to install. (Make sure you get the one for your truck!) I wish I would have known about this little lock before. It would have saved me a lot of hassle AND more importantly, money!

If you own a truck, do yourself a favor and install this little lock. Even if you have an older tailgate, can you afford to replace it?

 

 

This article first appeared on Ed That Matters.

Get updates in your email when a new article is posted. Sign Up Here! Or grab the RSS Feed.

If you enjoyed the article, please vote for the site at Top Prepper Websites.

Copyright – Content on Ed That Matters (unless the work of a Third-Party) may be reproduced in part or whole with attribution through a link to www.edthatmatters.com. If you are interested in a Third Party article, please contact the author for permission.

Earthstraw


The 4 Essential Items to Bring Hunting

shutterstock_166867142

Todd’s Note: This is a guest post.

When planning for a hunt, it’s important to pack the essential items that will make your trip both successful and enjoyable. Building the perfect pack can be expensive if you aren’t selective about what you include. In fact, a survey by the U.S. Department of the Interior shows that the average cost of trip-related expenses for hunters comes to about $762 per person.

Use this hunting checklist for a comprehensive list of what to bring, but in the meantime, here are a few tips to make sure you’re on the right track:

1. Spacious Backpack

One of the most important pieces of gear for any hunter is the pack—a pack that fails to live up to your needs can end your hunt before it even begins. Consider a hunting pack that will last a lifetime such as the Kifaru Timberline. Rated for loads of 100 pounds or more, the 7,200-cubic-inch Timberline has built-in pockets, side pockets, and center pockets for efficient storage of everything you need without sacrificing pack space for trophies and meat that you will be lugging back.

2. Dependable Boots

Consider the season, along with the nature of your hunt (active vs. sedentary) when selecting a pair of hunting boots. A good pair of boots can last for years and make your trips safe and comfortable.

  • Early season (late summer, early fall): Select footwear that offers heat relief and walking comfort
  • Mid-season (fall): Opt for insulated boots that will offer versatility during active hunts while protecting against cold weather
  • Late season (winter): Select heavily insulated pac boots with warmth-trapping liners to protect your feet from freezing temperatures

Lowa Footwear hiking boots, like their Renegade GTX, can be pricey, but the comfort and safety of your feet in the elements is well-worth the investment in quality. Renegade GTX leather hiking boots provide excellent traction and keep your feet dry throughout days of wet-weather tracking. Look for abrasion-resistant materials such as nylon and premium leathers.

3. Polarized Sunglasses

Don’t miss out on your lucky shot because of optic fatigue. Oakley Polarized Gasan Sunglasses are designed to block the glare that is created by flat surfaces such as snow and water, and are highly impact resistant. Be prepared with an extra pair of lenses which take up little room in your pack, and can be a lifesaver should you need a replacement.

4. Strong Knife

Select a well-made knife that you can use for many years to come. The Havalon Piranta-Bolt Hunting Knife comes with 12 replaceable blades and has an open back that makes cleaning simple. Each Piranta-Bolt comes with a black nylon belt holster, and Havalon offers them with a hunter’s orange handle, making them easy to spot.

What do you think?

 

This article first appeared on Ed That Matters.

Get updates in your email when a new article is posted. Sign Up Here! Or grab the RSS Feed.

If you enjoyed the article, please vote for the site at Top Prepper Websites.

Copyright – Content on Ed That Matters (unless the work of a Third-Party) may be reproduced in part or whole with attribution through a link to www.edthatmatters.com. If you are interested in a Third Party article, please contact the author for permission.

Earthstraw


Tweet This

"See Something?...Share Something." ;-)

Bugging Out & Relocating - What to Do When Staying Is Not an Option!

Bugging Out & Relocating

Bugging Out & Relocating

When I started in preparedness, I tried to “take-in” as much information as I could.  I still do  when it comes to finding articles to post on Prepper Website.  But lately, one person in the preparedness community that I have come to really listen to and respect is Fernando Aguirre (aka Ferfal).  I think that Aguirre brings experience and insight that many in the United States haven’t experienced, especially when it comes to urban survival and economic collapse.  I haven’t finished his first book yet, Surviving the Economic Collapse, but from what I have read, I would already recommend it.

Aguirre is a proponent of “bugging-in” when you can.  His first book deals with this extensively.  However, his most recent book discusses “bugging-out.”  He has first hand experience in this too, as he recently left Argentina.

Aquirre shares some info about his new book below…

Bugging Out & Relocating” is the “homework” I did for leaving Argentina.

This is about what I actually did, picking up a couple suitcases each, leaving everything behind and moving to a country I had never set foot on before. I basically did so by doing what I explain in this book. Surprisingly, it worked out pretty well. Some friends have told me about how “lucky” I was leaving Argentina just before it got even worse after Cristina Kirchner’s reelection. There’s always luck involved, but it was a lot of careful planning, researching and knowing the red flags to look for so as to know when you have to leave.  In this book I explain the criteria used, both for choosing a country and for knowing when to leave, some of the best options in terms of countries to relocate to, the various charts and rankings I took into consideration as well as plans laid out in case we had to bug out ahead of time within Argentina. I’m not much of a writer but I believe in the information provided in this book because it did work for me and maybe one day it will work for you too.

I wrote “Bugging Out & Relocating” because it applies to everyone, even if you’re not planning on going anywhere and you’re happy where you are, or even worse, if you think you’re already at your Bug Out Location (tip, such thing is not possible, when you live there, its no longer a potential BOL ) .

My first book, “The Modern Survival Manual”, was intended as a modern day, urban survival manual but it was clearly geared towards bugging in, staying put and getting by as best as you can, but as I explain in that same book, sometimes you don’t have an option, sometimes the only thing left to do is leave. I’m talking here about anything from a house fire, flood, various natural disasters, war, slow social collapse or a good old foreclosure. This book is about you not getting to choose if you stay or if you go.

This book is divided in two parts. Part I is about being ready to bug out when you simply have no choice but to evacuate. Anything from a house fire, flood,  hurricane or any other disaster that forces you to leave your current location. Part II is about Bugging Out Abroad, and extreme case of bugging out where you have to leave the entire country behind, either because of clear, direct threats or because of a slow degradation of quality of life. Here I cover some of the possible countries, include several charts and rankings to help make up your mind about any country not mentioned and I go a bit into relocating within USA as well.
Hope you guys enjoy it and let me know what you think once you get the chance to read it! Thank you all so much for your support over the years. I can’t thank you enough.

“Bugging Out & Relocating” is about what to do when staying is not an option. House fires, floods, storms, war or social collapse among countless other potential disasters may leave you with no other option but to leave. In his second book, Fernando Aguirre again writes from his personal experience and shares with the readers the research and criteria he used himself when he decided to leave everything behind. In this book you will find recommended countries, U.S. States and advice on Bugging Out both locally and Abroad.

 

Aguirre blogs over at The Modern Survivalist.  He also posts many helpful videos on Youtube.

 

Peace,
Todd

This article first appeared on Ed That Matters.

Get updates in your email when a new article is posted. Sign Up Here! Or grab the RSS Feed.

If you enjoyed the article, please vote for the site at Top Prepper Websites.

Copyright – Content on Ed That Matters (unless the work of a Third-Party) may be reproduced in part or whole with attribution through a link to www.edthatmatters.com. If you are interested in a Third Party article, please contact the author for permission.

Earthstraw


Tweet This

  • “Bugging Out & Relocating” is the “homework” I did for leaving Argentina.
  • My first book, “The Modern Survival Manual”, was intended as a modern day, urban survival...
"See Something?...Share Something." ;-)

Friends in Low Places or People You Can Count On When Your SHTF!

Friends SHTFI like to minimize risk. I don’t do extreme sports and I don’t usually like to take chances. So, when we decided to visit my eldest son in Branson, MO, who is doing a Summer Project with Campus Crusade for Christ, I made sure the ABS system and Traction Control were fixed, the oil was changed and the tires balanced and rotated on the Griswold mobile! I also double checked my car emergency kit and bought some better jumper cables to leave in the vehicle.

The trip up to Branson was mostly uneventful. We were packed: the wife, two teenagers, 1 of their friends and my parents. The kids slept, listened to music, played on their phones, tooted and we enjoyed the scenery, especially the mountains. I don’t usually have my Google location service turned on, but I turned it on in Little Rock, Arkansas. And wouldn’t you know it, the Google Map APP took us directly to the hotel without fail. We checked in, drove to the spot in front of our room, I put the van in reverse to straighten out and that’s when I felt the pop! I put the van in drive and it wouldn’t go! After a few moments of panic and messing with the shifter, the kids and my dad pushed me the 5 feet into the parking space.

We arrived around 2:45 p.m. and had tickets for the Southern Belle Showboat at 4 p.m. I asked the front desk for a few numbers to some cab companies and had two cabs pick us up in time to make our reservation. While we waited, I texted my mechanic and called a friend from church who works in parts at a Chevrolet dealer here in town. While I was doing all this, I found out that the closest Chevy/Saturn dealer was in the next town.

I explained to my friend and my mechanic friend (through text), that the van was still in gear and that the shifter was free flowing. After I turned the van off, I couldn’t turn it back on because of the failsafe that the van has. My Chevy dealer friend informed me that a small dealership would probably not have the part I needed, but he said that he could overnight it to them if I needed it. This was Sunday, that meant that the cable wouldn’t get to the dealership till Tuesday and then it would have to be installed. We were planning on leaving Tuesday morning. As it all sunk in, the stress: physical, mental and financial, were all starting to pile up!

We attended the Southern Belle Show and called cabs to get back to the hotel. I immediately started looking up car rental places online since we were going to need something to get around in. And, I also started looking up possible reasons why my Saturn Relay would do this. At around that time, my mechanic friend called and told me after thinking about it for a bit, it was probably the shift cable. The cable snaps on top of the lever that switches the gear in the transmission. It is held by a grommet that can eventually deteriorate. If I could get the cable to sit on top of the lever and then zip tie it in place, once I get the van in gear, it would stay there. He told me that I should look under the van, on the driver side, by the brake booster, I couldn’t miss it. As he was telling me this, I rolled my eyes.  Even with the fix, did I want to drive all the way to Houston like this?

After a few minutes of thinking about it, I decided to try and get my fat butt under the van enough to see the piece he was talking about. My car kit has a cheap fleece blanket I bought during Christmas clearance for $1.99. I unrolled it and laid it down under the van. I grabbed my Waka Waka Solar Lamp for some light and started “playing mechanic.” It didn’t take long to locate the piece. I moved the lever to the park position, placed the cable on the lever and wouldn’t you know it, the van started and I was able to put it in to gear and reverse. However, when I moved it to drive, the cable fell off. I was going to need to zip tie the cable in place.

The hotel provided some zip ties and my son was able to get under the van enough to get the zip ties tight. Once again, I got in and started the van and I was able to reverse and drive! I felt a big sigh of relief, however, the stress was still there. Did I want to risk traveling back from Branson, going through the Ozark Mountains with this fix? I’m talking about 600 miles, 10 straight hours! I was really worried about the road from Harrison to Conway. It was very windy, had some steep hills and not a lot of room for roadside repairs. If the cable was going to pop-off gear going up a mountain, it would most likely be during this leg of the trip.

Top View of the Fix.  Notice the Arrow.

Top view of the fix. Notice the arrow.

 

This is a close-up shot. Top view of the fix.

This is a close-up shot. Top view of the fix.

Well, we risked it and made it back in one piece. We stopped once for gas. I shifted into neutral and turned off the car. It started back up with no problem. We stopped to eat, but I never took my foot off the brake and we ate in the van on the road! I knew we were going to be good when we hit a BIG bump crossing over a bridge and the zip ties held. Although it was nice to visit with my eldest son and to see Branson, the trip was very stressful for me. But I was grateful for knowing others who could help me when the chips were down.

We always hear that SHTF doesn’t have to be the End of the World. A SHTF scenario can be a scenario that only affects YOU or YOUR FAMILY. Now, to be honest, this wasn’t a true SHTF scenario. The cost was only extra money spent. But, if you are in a situation when you don’t have the extra money to spend on what is needed, then things can become very depressing and more serious.

Some Take-A-Ways

It’s always good to have people you can go to for help. I was grateful that I could call a few people with knowledge about cars and car repair, especially people who knew I was in a bind and who were thinking about my situation while they were back at home. In a SHTF scenario, you should have people you can count on. No one knows everything! It is important to build networks of people that you can trust. But remember, to have friends, you have to be a friend and help others too.

When you have to risk, try to minimize the risk. My mechanic friend told me that the worst case scenario if the zip ties came off was that I would have to just put some new ties on. Of course, he wasn’t thinking about the terrain in the mountains. So, we tried to minimize the time and effort that it would take by purchasing a good jack and stands. If we needed to get under the van again, it would be a lot faster than struggling with stretching and contorting under the van.

Having tools is always helpful. I was glad to have a cheap blanket to use. I didn’t take work clothes and I really didn’t want to mess up my “vacation” clothes. In reality, this wouldn’t have been a big deal, but still. The Waka Waka Solar Light was very helpful too. It shines a lot of light and I could set it down and aim it where I needed light.

Just be prepared for CRAP to happen. We can live in fear and worry all our lives. There is always “something” that could ruin our day, month or year! When we live in fear, we live in stress and that isn’t good. It’s better to try and make the best of it. This is easier said than done, but I have learned that it becomes easier if you put things in perspective. Just knowing that, “it’s just money,” or “it’s just a missed appointment,” or “it’s just time,” and that everyone is safe and healthy is key to your overall outlook.

And for your viewing pleasure….

 

 

 

This article first appeared on Ed That Matters.

Get updates in your email when a new article is posted. Sign Up Here! Or grab the RSS Feed.

If you enjoyed the article, please vote for the site at Top Prepper Websites.

Copyright – Content on Ed That Matters (unless the work of a Third-Party) may be reproduced in part or whole with attribution through a link to www.edthatmatters.com. If you are interested in a Third Party article, please contact the author for permission.

Earthstraw


Tweet This

  • When you have to risk, try to minimize the risk.
  • Just be prepared for CRAP to happen.
"See Something?...Share Something." ;-)