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Fat Guys in the Woods

Fat Guys in the Woods - Weather Channel - Airs August 10, 2014

Fat Guys in the Woods – Weather Channel – Airs August 10, 2014

The Prepper, Survival, Homesteading, Bushcraft, Whatever You Want to Call Us Community, does not need another reality show to make us look like kooks. And although a mature person can look at a TV show and get “something out of it,” many in the community feel it does more harm than good in spreading the need to be prepared. We’ll keep to Youtube and websites thank you very much!

But what if one of our own pulled it off? What if one of our own starred in a TV show and shared survival techniques with others in a way that wasn’t sensational? Would you watch it? I did! And I hope many others do too!

The Weather Channel will start airing the TV show, Fat Guys in the Woods, starring well known survivalist, Creek Stewart. The idea behind this show is that Creek takes guys who are not your typical survivalist into the woods for a week. He teaches them the basics of survival and after a few days, lets them go out on their own to survive for a night. The guys are doing it to get motivated and improve their health, all in the context of learning survival skills.

This first episode takes place in the Smokey Mountains during Winter. During the video, it snows and the temps fall to 15 degrees Fahrenheit. We are introduced to 3 overweight friends who are going out to meet Creek in the woods. After introductions, Creek gives them a pack with a Mora Knife and a metal canteen (something like this). As they trek into the woods, you can tell that the guys are breathing hard as they try to walk and talk.

On the way to find an appropriate place to setup camp, one of the guys makes a comment about eating. Creek shares the Rule of 3 and asks him what he thinks their priority might be. Creek finally settles on a campsite and explains the reasons why: a lot of natural resources, open space and close enough to the water. Creek explains that they are going to build a traditional wikiup that will allow them to all sleep inside with a fire. He states that they should first build their bed so that the cold ground doesn’t “suck the heat out of your body.” To help with the shelter, Creek provides each of the guys with a saw blade and shows them how to make a bow saw.

The second priority that Creek works with the guys on is how to build a fire. Creek shows the guys how to use a flint and steel with char-cloth. After he explains how to use it, he throws the flint into the woods. Yes, this move is unnecessary, but the purpose is to take the guys down to the creek bed and help them to find their own flint. After a little searching, they do. They go back to the campsite and with Creek’s advice of staying patient and “not to rush it,” they are successful in building a fire together.

The next day, Creek shows the guys how to make a snare. On the third day, they catch a rabbit and Creek shows them how to field dress it, along with cooking the meaty parts and making a stew out of the edible organs and skull. At one point, one of the friends remarks how the last time they were out they had a whole table full of food and shoved it in their mouth without even thinking about it. They all eat and drink the stew, remarking how good it tastes. On day five, each friend takes off on their own tasked with building a shelter and fire completely on their own. Creek makes visits to each and encourages them as they go through their day.

A one hour show is not going to be perfect! Of course, there were things that I would have liked to be explained in greater detail for anyone seeing these skills for the first time. For instance, I would have liked to see step by step details on how to make the bow saw. I would have liked more of a step by step on the wikiup. I would have liked to see more specifics on making the snares, char-cloth and finding flint. To do all of this would take a 5 hour show. And in reality, all of the specifics can be found in great detail online. (follow the links)

I really like how positive this show is. Creek is always encouraging and affirming. The premise is one that many in the preparedness community talk about, getting healthy before the SHTF. It also shows how easy some of these skills are with practice, but you have to do it. You need to get out there before you actually need it! One of the guys mentions that they would have never been able to do this if it wasn’t for Creek showing them. We all need someone helping us out along the way. The show ends with the guys around the fire and Creek sharing some final words of encouragement and affirmation. I love that! And from what I know about Creek, this falls right in line with his character! This show is so different than the others on TV!

Lastly, I want to point out that there is a difference in the reactions of the friends in the show. The show didn’t try to catch them making weird faces, you know the ones I mean, with big bug eyes before they cut to a commercial. You can SEE the excitement in their face when they accomplish a task. When one of the friends mentions that he has never had to kill something for sustenance, you can tell that he is not just saying it for dramatic effect. You can SEE the pride they feel when they have realized that they were very capable of surviving for a week in the woods.

Fat Guys in the Woods airs on August 10, 2014 @ 10:00 p.m. E.T. on the Weather Channel. Make sure you watch it and show your support for one of the “good survival shows.”

Creek Stewart is owner of Willow Haven Outdoors Survival School. He is the author of the very popular books, Build the Perfect Bug Out Bag, The Unofficial Hunger Games Survival Manual and Build the Perfect Bug Out Vehicle (which is shown at the beginning of the show). He also blogs at WillowHavenOutdoor.com.

This article first appeared on Ed That Matters.

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Earthstraw



"See Something?...Share Something." ;-)

Todd Sepulveda

Todd is the owner/editor of Prepper Website, a DAILY preparedness aggregator that links to the best articles on the internet. He is a public school administrator and a pastor. Todd also blogs at Ed That Matters on matters of preparedness and from time to time, education. Connect with Todd on one of the social media outlets below.

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Bless Your Heart!

A little south for ya!

 

bless

This article first appeared on Ed That Matters.

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Copyright – Content on Ed That Matters (unless the work of a Third-Party) may be reproduced in part or whole with attribution through a link to www.edthatmatters.com. If you are interested in a Third Party article, please contact the author for permission.

Earthstraw



"See Something?...Share Something." ;-)

Todd Sepulveda

Todd is the owner/editor of Prepper Website, a DAILY preparedness aggregator that links to the best articles on the internet. He is a public school administrator and a pastor. Todd also blogs at Ed That Matters on matters of preparedness and from time to time, education. Connect with Todd on one of the social media outlets below.

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Homemade Pest Control Solutions

Termite Control

Todd’s Note: This is a guest post. I have never seen the recipe that is mentioned here before.  I have seen variations, but not this one.  If you have used this one or have a better one, please share it in the comments.  Hopefully, the more people that realize that harsh chemicals shouldn’t be used in our environment, the better.  For organic weed control recipes, see the Gardening Link Bomb.

You don’t have to spend lots of money and fill your garage with toxic chemicals to control pests in your home and garden. You just have to know some DIY methods to mix organic pesticides and garden sprays.

You also can make some simple tools to help figure out what kind of pest you may have. Whether it’s mice in the basement, ants in the kitchen, silverfish in the bathroom or other pesky pests, you can get rid of them yourself without calling an exterminator or resorting to chemicals.

Is it Termites?

You may not know when termites are damaging your home’s structure unless you know what to look for. Entomologist Ron Harrison, says a swarm of winged insects or piles of dried, discarded wings, mud tubes and wood-colored droppings near your house can indicate the presence of termites and warrants more investigation. Clean and seal any wood where you see these signs to keep insects from slipping into the wood to eat and nest in comfort.

Wet wood and moist conditions attract termites, so it’s good to know if any areas of your house have high moisture conditions. Moisture meters for wood can be expensive, and modifying a multimeter to read moisture levels can be tricky. Hiring a termite expert to test the wood in your home can be worth the diagnostic cost to know if you’ve got termite conditions. Then, you’ll either be relieved or be prepared to control it.

Keep Ants Out

No one wants ants in the kitchen, by the garbage or in the dog or cat’s food dish. When you see a line of ants marching through your kitchen, prepare a natural solution to put in a spray bottle and spray to kill.

  • 1 teaspoon dishwashing soap (not detergent)
  • 1 teaspoon cooking oil
  • 1 quart water

Spray this on ants and into any ant hill or nest you find. It also works on other soft-bodied insects like earwigs, aphids and mealy bugs.

In the Garden

The dish soap/cooking oil mixture also works in the garden for spot shots to kill caterpillars, wasps, flies and mites. Exchange hot pepper sauce for the cooking oil for an even stronger pesticide spray.

Strongly scented oils work well for the worst garden and outdoor offenders—fleas, ticks and mosquitoes. Spray cedar oil mixed with water on lawns and shrubs to repel biting bugs and kill their eggs, too. However, experts at Colorado State University caution against using this spray on sensitive plants like roses or drought-stressed plants.

Deer Repellent

Tired of the deer nibbling your yard and garden to nubs? Try mixing an egg and water solution, and spraying it on the vegetation you want to protect. Add a little hot sauce for extra protective power. And, if that doesn’t discourage them to stop foraging in your yard, try hanging some cheap fragrant soap around plants they’re sampling. Use the strongest smelling soaps you can for the best results.

 

 

This article first appeared on Ed That Matters.

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If you enjoyed the article, please vote for the site at Top Prepper Websites.

Copyright – Content on Ed That Matters (unless the work of a Third-Party) may be reproduced in part or whole with attribution through a link to www.edthatmatters.com. If you are interested in a Third Party article, please contact the author for permission.

Earthstraw



"See Something?...Share Something." ;-)

Todd Sepulveda

Todd is the owner/editor of Prepper Website, a DAILY preparedness aggregator that links to the best articles on the internet. He is a public school administrator and a pastor. Todd also blogs at Ed That Matters on matters of preparedness and from time to time, education. Connect with Todd on one of the social media outlets below.

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Outdoor Sink

Some of you know that my dad has a place in East Texas that we have been working on.  The property is completely off-grid.  When we go up there, we draw water out of the well and then hold it in a 5 gallon bucket with a spout.  We have had to use valuable table space to set this up, with another 5 gallon bucket below to catch the water.

We’ve decided that we are going to focus on having an outdoor kitchen since cooking inside, without AC would be hot.  One of the first steps was to build an outdoor sink.  This would be something that would be very helpful to us now.

I researched online a little bit and found some examples, but there weren’t as many as I would have liked.  One of the purposes of this post is to put up another example for someone in the future to look at.

I’m not a carpenter by far.  But this is my attempt.

I purchased a laundry tub sink from Home Depot and used it without the stands that it comes with.  I also used five 2 x 4′s (10 feet) and 1 piece of ply wood.  Since the sink is going to stay outside permanently, I used treated wood.

s1

The laundry tub is a little awkward 22 x 25 inches.  I need to be able to use a 5 gallon bucket until we run lines, so I needed to leave a little room where the bucket could sit.  I have another bucket underneath to catch the water.

I wish I would have taken some pics of the build and actually written down the dimensions, but I was up against the clock and I was rushing.

Side view.

Side view.

The only thing I wish I would have done was to make it a little taller, only because it is a pain to get the bucket underneath out.  However, I did measure how tall my home kitchen sink was and used that same height.  I tried to remember that women and kids will be using this sink too in the future.

What would you have done to improve on this design?

 

Peace,
Todd

 

This article first appeared on Ed That Matters.

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Copyright – Content on Ed That Matters (unless the work of a Third-Party) may be reproduced in part or whole with attribution through a link to www.edthatmatters.com. If you are interested in a Third Party article, please contact the author for permission.

Earthstraw



"See Something?...Share Something." ;-)

Todd Sepulveda

Todd is the owner/editor of Prepper Website, a DAILY preparedness aggregator that links to the best articles on the internet. He is a public school administrator and a pastor. Todd also blogs at Ed That Matters on matters of preparedness and from time to time, education. Connect with Todd on one of the social media outlets below.

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Anyone Can Do it! Fool-Proof Food Storage!

cansWhat do you say when people ask you how to get prepared?  There are so many ideas floating around in the preparedness community.  The two questions I ask are:

  • How much water do you have stored?
  • How much food do you have in your pantry?

For anyone starting in preparedness, these two areas are the starting points….the starting points!!!!

Water storage is pretty easy.  You can stock up on cases of water bottles, clean out 2 litter soda bottles, get a 55 gallon drum and even get a Water Bob that can be deployed in no time!

Food storage is a little bit different.  Tons of articles have been written on freeze-dried, dehydrated, MRE’s, DIY canning, mylar bags and O2 absorbers, gardening, etc…  For the newbie, it can be very overwhelming and discouraging!!!!

So, where do you start?  You start with something that is fool poof! What is fool-proof food storage?  Stock up on canned food that you can buy at your local grocery store!  This is  fool-proof and will allow you to put away 2 weeks easily!

But wait…there’s more to this fool-proof food storage story!

When I was researching this article, I was prepared to come up with food recipes that only needed canned food items from the grocery store to be prepared.  However, in my research, I found an older website, Y2K mind you, that has already done this for you!  The cool thing is that there are recipes for main dishes, desserts, breads, soups and more that you can make with just items purchased from the grocery store!

From Emergency Kitchen:

All recipes call for what I think of as the “regular” size can. It varies a bit, but is about 14 or 15 ounces. I don’t specify the size if using this size can. I indicate if another size is called for. All times are for a regular stove, so you’ll have to adjust for your cooking surface.

I use a 12 inch cast iron skillet or a Dutch oven for just about everything.

I only use ingredients you can purchase in your grocery or warehouse store. You may have to try more than one store for some of the more weird ones, like “Just Whites.” Just Whites are powdered egg whites found in the baking section of most grocery stores (at least in my area).

The Main Dishes include:

Beef Biscuit
Chicken Spaghetti
10 Minute Italian Meal
Camp Fire Supper
Baked Bean Crown Roast
Gin’s Tuna Mac
Chicken Stew
Corned Beef and Rice
Corned Beef Hash
Easy Rice and Bean Wraps
Stir Fry Noodles and Rice
Tomato Macaroni and Cheese
Linguini with Clam Sauce (Red or White)
Ramen Casserole
Rice and Beans
Salmon Patties
Sweet and Sour Beans and Ham
Sweet and Sour Spam
Turkey and Dressing

Warning – This an older website, I mean like from the 1990′s!  But the info. is great!  I would read over the recipes, maybe even try a few if you’re not sure that they will work for you.  You can print them out and keep them in one place.  You’ll have to play with the serving sizes to see if they meet your families needs, but after that, you have a plan that is easily managed!

Choose 7 recipes, make your list of ingredients, double it and you have 2 weeks worth of food storage in dinners.  Of course, you will need breakfast and lunch.  But this takes the guessing away from what to do and where to start!

After you check out the recipes at Emergency Kitchen, check out some of the other articles!

 

The Prepared Bloggers - How We Preserve Foods

Join us as we share different reasons and methods of how we preserve food to create a long-term storage plan for our families. Click on each link to be taken to a new blog with helpful information and tips.

Mom with a PREPHow to Dehydrate Ginger and Make Ginger Powder

Preparedness MamaMake Jam Without Pectin

Mama KautzDehydrating

Busy B HomemakerFreezer Jam

Ed That MattersAnyone Can Do It: Fool Proof Food Storage

The Apartment PrepperEasy Marinated Mushrooms

The Homesteading HippyHow to Use Your Pressure Canner

Montana HomesteaderMaking and Preserving Cherry Pit Syrup

Are We Crazy or WhatHow to Dehydrate Cherries

Your Thrive LifeHow I Preserve Food: Meals in a Jar

Melissa K NorrisRe-Usable Canning Tattler Lids-Do They Really Work?

Real Food LivingPreserve and Store Grains wiith Dry Ice

Cooke’s FrontierSmoking

Homestead DreamerWater Bath Canning

Evergrowing FarmHow to Preserve Red Chile

Survival SherpaModern Mountain Man MRE’s

The Backyard PioneerFermentation

Trayer WildernessHow We Preserve Food

Living Life in Rural IowaVegetable Soup

The Organic PrepperHow to Make Jam without using added Pectin

Homesteading MomHow I Preserve Broccoli and Goat Cheese Soup

A Matter of PreparednessHow I Preserve Using Mylar Bags

 

 

This article first appeared on Ed That Matters.

Get updates in your email when a new article is posted. Join the Newsletter or grab the RSS Feed.

If you enjoyed the article, please vote for the site at Top Prepper Websites.

Copyright – Content on Ed That Matters (unless the work of a Third-Party) may be reproduced in part or whole with attribution through a link to www.edthatmatters.com. If you are interested in a Third Party article, please contact the author for permission.

Earthstraw



"See Something?...Share Something." ;-)

Todd Sepulveda

Todd is the owner/editor of Prepper Website, a DAILY preparedness aggregator that links to the best articles on the internet. He is a public school administrator and a pastor. Todd also blogs at Ed That Matters on matters of preparedness and from time to time, education. Connect with Todd on one of the social media outlets below.

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