Ed That Matters https://www.edthatmatters.com Preparedness is an Educated Choice! Sun, 26 Jan 2020 03:53:33 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.3.2 https://www.edthatmatters.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/cropped-PrepperWebsiteLogo-CIRCLE-32x32.png Ed That Matters https://www.edthatmatters.com 32 32 Following #Coronavirus on Twitter and Other Places https://www.edthatmatters.com/following-coronavirus-on-twitter-and-other-places/ https://www.edthatmatters.com/following-coronavirus-on-twitter-and-other-places/#respond Sun, 26 Jan 2020 03:53:33 +0000 https://www.edthatmatters.com/?p=34234 The news about the Coronavirus has been slowly ramping up.  There are many who are sounding the alarm and others who remind everyone to stay calm.  My opinion is to stay cautious and informed!  One way I do that is to follow what is happening on Twitter.  This post will share out some items I have seen and shared on Twitter, as well as other helpful links and information from other places as well. From the Email List In the Sat. Prep (sign-up for the email here), I shared a link to BNO News that tracks the latest information about

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The news about the Coronavirus has been slowly ramping up.  There are many who are sounding the alarm and others who remind everyone to stay calm.  My opinion is to stay cautious and informed!  One way I do that is to follow what is happening on Twitter.  This post will share out some items I have seen and shared on Twitter, as well as other helpful links and information from other places as well.

From the Email List

In the Sat. Prep (sign-up for the email here), I shared a link to BNO News that tracks the latest information about the Coronavirus.  It is updated often.  The site tracks the virus in China and other parts of the world.  It also had a nice timeline you can follow below the map.  You can check out the Tracking Map by clicking here.  The map below is a live embedded map that you can manipulate.

 

On Twitter

Of course, there is not a way to confirm these Tweets.  So, it is good to take all the information you see as a whole and come up with your own opinion.

 

 

 

 

 

 

On this one, you’ll have to turn on captions.  It is the “cc” on the bottom right of the video.

 

 

 

 

In the Email Group

In the Exclusive Prepper Website Email Group, a member shared this helpful bit of information from a personal friend and medical professional who has a lot of experience dealing with Influenza flu (not Coronavirus) in a hospital setting.

Please remember that all these herbals are mostly for reinforcing the most powerful influenza defense you have. Your own immune system. Mankind has been battling disease long before we “discovered” supporting herbs and foods.

Indeed most if not all of those discoveries were discovered that we “Felt Better” after eating….

To HELP your Immune System. Get plenty of rest, drink plenty of water (Your morning urine will be yellow, the other 3 visits should be straw yellow or clear) eat healthy foods AND be aware of how you feel after you eat.

Chicken soup has been proven to help. Easy nutrition, extra fluids. MY GO TO when I have the “I WANNA DIE FLU” is Hot Kimchee Soup. It’s a cross between “Fire Cider” (Which WORKS pretty well for me) and Chicken Soup. Fermented foods SUPPORT the Gut which is most of your Immune System.

Hot Kimchee Soup Super Jewish Penicillin. Lots of Garlic, hot peppers, fermented goodies, easy nutrition.

So to reduce exposure to pathogens. Wear a mask if a lot of folks are getting sick. Wash your hands BEFORE touching your mucus membranes like your mouth, nose eyes. Reduce your time of exposure to sick people I. E. think are you shopping because your bored (I am often guilty here) or because you NEED to get IN (With a LIST AND a Plan to get’er DONE and gone..) for 10 days of food and critical needs.

Isolation protocol. To reduce bringing pathogens INTO your home. OUTSIDE your home set up IN THE SUNSHINE a place to spread out your groceries. Allow them to “Air Out” and get some sunshine (UV) decontamination. EVERY LITTLE BIT HELPS here folks.

Set up a strip and wash zone. Assume your covered in nastiness and figure out how to get home and CLEAN UP before you hug your kids, sit on that sofa (making it contaminated) and in general not track it all over your house. Maybe a Soap and Water “Whores Bath” of your #1 your Hands #2 Face #3 Hair (a wonderful place for Flu Bugs to await your families kisses) and the AGAIN your hands.

Plastic bags to transport laundry into the ready washing machine WEAR a Mask when loading machine and WASH your Hands again.

Soap and Water are your friends.

IF despite all this effort you get sick, when you first notice it BLAST it with Isolation (as not to spread it to the rest of your family) plenty of bed rest, hydration good nutrition and whatever herbals you feel the need to add.

I always KNOW I’m coming down with something. DO NOT WAIT until your “Really Sick” to start self medicating. Stomp it NOW and thus your immune system has the best chance to destroy this problem before it’s overwhelmed.

You could look it up but the time from “Your feeling Poorly” to your really SICK from a nasty influenza is around 3 days. That second day or so YOUR Spewing Flu bugs all around. THUS the NEED to Isolate yourself ASAP. Any MASK is better than NO Mask. Always MASK the SICK ONES as they are SPEWING with every cough the BUG.

I’ve been working in the hospital system for decades. I’ve seen and survived many a nasty flu seasons as everybody SICK shows up to see us. The Above has been my personal FLU season protocol and has always done me well.

 

Like I said above, get informed and form your own opinions.  Ultimately, you are responsible for yourself and your family!

 

Peace,
Todd

 

 

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]]> https://www.edthatmatters.com/following-coronavirus-on-twitter-and-other-places/feed/ 0 Tyranny & The Battle of Athens, Tennessee https://www.edthatmatters.com/battle-of-athens-tennesse/ https://www.edthatmatters.com/battle-of-athens-tennesse/#comments Sat, 18 Jan 2020 12:38:29 +0000 https://www.edthatmatters.com/?p=1819     The Battle of Athens Tennesse happened in 1946.  But how will the future look back on OUR time?  Will we be the people who recognized the times?  Will we be people who realized the slow disintegration of our rights and freedoms that then moved to a tsunami of laws and government involvement in every aspect of our lives from dictating which milk we can drink to if we can harvest the water off our own roof?  Or, will we be the people who as long as our AC was pumping cold air and McDonald’s was serving up Big

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Battle of Athens Tennesse

 

The Battle of Athens Tennesse happened in 1946.  But how will the future look back on OUR time?  Will we be the people who recognized the times?  Will we be people who realized the slow disintegration of our rights and freedoms that then moved to a tsunami of laws and government involvement in every aspect of our lives from dictating which milk we can drink to if we can harvest the water off our own roof?  Or, will we be the people who as long as our AC was pumping cold air and McDonald’s was serving up Big Macs that we were content with sitting in front of the TV watching the latest show that allowed our minds to veg and decay?  Only time will tell where we end up.

But we are not the first example of a people who encountered tyranny.  In fact, this isn’t our first go around here in this nation!  We all know about July 4, the day we celebrate Independence Day from the tyrannical rule of King George III of England.  We remember the sacrifice of many men, who would have rather lost EVERYTHING (some did) instead of live with the chains of bondage.  But now, fireworks, hamburgers and apple pie have taken the place of God, country, and freedom.  Sometimes it seems we have taken too much for granted in exchange for a life of “ease and safety.”

Maybe we are too weak!  Maybe we have lost the fire and sense of purpose that the Founding Fathers exhibited.  Or, let’s not even go back that far.  Maybe we should be like the “Greatest Generation” that experienced the Depression and World War II?  They got things done, like the men of Athens and Etowah, Tennessee.

A recent comment on If They Mean to Have A War, Let It Begin Here!, brought to my attention the events of August 1-2, 1946.  Until the comment, I had never heard of this incident.  But it is a true story that everyone should hear!

The Battle of Athens

What do you expect from GI’s that have been serving their country all over the world?  What should we expect from men who were on a mission to free the world of a crazed, tyrannical leader?  We should expect that they come home and get to experience the same freedoms that they were helping to secure across the ocean!  But, that’s not what the GI’s of Athens and Etowah, Tennesse experienced!

Background

After experiencing corruption by the McMinn County Sheriff department and multiple election years of voter fraud, which were reported to the Department of Justice with no follow-through, returning GI’s decided to help their county become corrupt-free by forming the GI Non-Partisan League and supporting veteran Knox Henry in the August 1946 election for Sheriff.

The Battle

As the polls closed, deputies seized ballot boxes and took them to the jail. Opposition veterans responded by arming themselves and marching there. Some of them had raided the National Guard Armory, obtaining arms and ammunition.[9] Estimates of the number of veterans besieging the jail vary from several hundred[9] to as high as 2,000.[7]

When the men reached the jail, it was barricaded and manned by 55 deputies. The veterans demanded the ballot boxes but were refused. They then opened fire on the jail, initiating a battle that lasted several hours by some accounts,[7][9] considerably less by others.[10] In the end, the door of the jail was dynamited and breached. The barricaded deputies—some with injuries—surrendered, and the ballot boxes were recovered.

Source: Wikipedia

athens

Results

The veterans were successful in bringing change and reform.  However, the change the GI League supported fell apart soon after the election.  The “political machine” returned!  The point here is that men fought against a tyrannical system, with firearms, because they HAD to, and won!  We can’t  forget that!

For more info. on the Battle of Athens – Click here

Real patriots don’t want to pick up their guns at the first sign of pain.  History has shown that patriots do it as a last resort.  But even as recent as 1946, men realized that it was necessary to pick up arms to defend what was right.  The question is, will THIS generation, or if necessary, future generations, take up arms to do what is right?

Extras

I noticed on Wikipedia that Hallmark made a movie “based” on the events of the Battle of Athens.  I was able to find it on the AR15 Forums and I’m linking it here below straight from Youtube.  Since it’s Hallmark, I’m thinking “date movie!” 😉

 

 

 

Peace,
Todd

 

Battle of Athens

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]]> https://www.edthatmatters.com/battle-of-athens-tennesse/feed/ 2 The State of Preparedness 2020 https://www.edthatmatters.com/preparedness-2020/ https://www.edthatmatters.com/preparedness-2020/#comments Tue, 31 Dec 2019 23:00:38 +0000 https://www.edthatmatters.com/?p=34219 Come out from your bunkers!  Happy days are here again!  This is the State of Preparedness 2020!  Not! Those of us in the Preparedness Community, who have been in it for a while, have been decrying the current state of preparedness.  Please don’t pass this off as a scare tactic.  I’m sharing what I’ve been seeing and experiencing for a while now.  Preparedness is dying.  This is the real State of Preparedness 2020! I’m not the only one saying it.  Others have mentioned it out in public.  Many have confided to me through email, not wanting to mention it out

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Preparedness 2020

Come out from your bunkers!  Happy days are here again!  This is the State of Preparedness 2020!  Not!

Those of us in the Preparedness Community, who have been in it for a while, have been decrying the current state of preparedness.  Please don’t pass this off as a scare tactic.  I’m sharing what I’ve been seeing and experiencing for a while now.  Preparedness is dying.  This is the real State of Preparedness 2020!

I’m not the only one saying it.  Others have mentioned it out in public.  Many have confided to me through email, not wanting to mention it out in an open forum.  It feels almost sacrilegious to admit it.

Possible Reasons for The Prepper Decline?

Some say it is because we have a Republican President in office.  I will admit that I did see the overall numbers of Prepper Website go down after Trump’s election.  It is like some in the Preparedness Community believe that Republican’s will set the world right and save the Union from any SHTF possibilities.  Those who don’t have their heads in the sand know that although President Trump has done some good things (and some questionable things), a President isn’t the only one that makes decisions in this country.  And even more, many of the things that were hoped he would do, haven’t been done.  There are many factors that come into play here.  But those factors are not the purpose of this article.

Others say that the economy is so good that there is no need to prep.  As long as the stock market produces big numbers, then we all benefit from the prosperity of the bankers and traders making a fortune.  But we know this isn’t true either.  The blessings on Wall Street haven’t found their way to Main Street.  Just go to the grocery store and buy a week’s worth of food for your family.  If you do the shopping for your family, you know what I’m talking about!  Everything is getting more expensive and our paychecks aren’t reflecting any real income increases.

The other big reason, in my humble opinion, is that many preppers succumbed to Prepper Fatigue.  You can only hear the “sky is falling” so much before you kick Chicken Little in the head and move on.  The problem with this is that true preparedness isn’t about just being prepared for the big one!  It can include that.  But in reality, it is a lifestyle of responsibility for you and your family.  Reasons to be prepared come up every single day.  But, I know I’m preaching to the choir here.

Seeing the Prepper Flame Burnout

Actually, I’ve been talking about this for a while now, longer than President Trump’s election.  In fact, back in May 2017, I wrote Do Dead Prepper’s Tell Tales.  In that article, I referenced another article about prepper websites closing up.  I wrote that article in August 2014 – The SAD Way of Preparedness Websites – Possibly An Analogy of the Preparedness Life!.   The difference between those two articles and this one is that new prepper related websites were popping up all the time.  That’s life, the new rise up to replace the old.  But this isn’t happening this time.  At least I don’t see it!

This week, I removed another 5 websites from Prepper Website.  I use a Broken Link Checker to see if websites that I have linked to are still active.  I don’t necessarily remove the links to their articles, I remove the link to the website itself.  I also removed about 6 different websites from Top Prepper Websites for the same reason.  These sites, with all of their preparedness articles and information, just disappeared, without a word.

The Warning

The main issue here is the availability of prepper information to those who realize they need to prep and start to search for the information that is no longer online.  Why?  Because nothing has changed in the fundamentals of our economy.  It is still being propped up in a big way.  Nothing has changed with terrorism.  Nothing has changed with the possibility of a pandemic jumping over from another country and running through the US like wildfire.  Nothing has changed with how Murphy likes to show up and kick you in the pants when you are down.

In fact, things have become worse.  If you are still paying attention to what is going on in this country, you know we are more divided than ever.  Many believe that the 2020 Election will not be as civil as we would like it.  Big weather events seem to be the norm.  And drought and flooding can easily see us one growing season away from food prices going through the roof.

There is still a need for prepper information.  There will always be a need for preparedness information!  And in this world where all sorts of information are so readily available, it is to our advantage that we ensure prepper articles, podcasts and videos are there for the next person who wakes up to the need to prepare!

What Can Be Done in “Preparedness 2020?”

For the “true believer,” there are some things that can be done to help those websites, podcasts, and Youtubers who are providing Prepper content.

1. Read, Listen, Watch and Comment on Preparedness Content.  When a content creator produces content and few people interact with it, it is so depressing.  Many times, we put our hearts, time and a lot of effort into our content only to hear crickets.  Now, not every piece of prepper content is stellar, that’s a fact.  But if a piece has blessed you in some way, leave a comment or send an email to the author.  I can tell you that it would be greatly appreciated!

2. Click on their Affiliate Links. Many prepper websites don’t make a lot of money.  But many of them have an affiliate association with Amazon.  When you make a purchase through a preparedness website’s link, it doesn’t cost you any more money and it gives them a little percentage of the sale, no matter what you buy.  At the end of the month, even $50 can be a big blessing to someone creating content for free.

3. Support Individuals, Not Companies. This may sound weird, but some companies have purchased active preparedness websites to promote their own agenda.  I have been approached to sell Prepper Website many times too.  I do what I do more out of mission than money, so I always just send those emails and requests to the delete folder.  But you can always tell a “fishy” website because there isn’t an individual behind it or they want to be “anonymous.”  Look for “about” pages and real people that you can interact with, that will respond to you!

4. Share Preparedness Content. I’m done with Facebook and Instagram.  I’m posting this article on Ed that Matters because FB and IG have been blocking any links to Prepper Website.  Somehow, preparedness is against “Community Standards.” However, I’m still “auto-sending” to the Prepper Website FB Group and Page other preparedness website articles.  I’m doing this because there are so many people still using FB and IG.  I shared about this on IG and talked about it on the podcast.  But you can help others by sharing out their content on social media, email, and word of mouth.  The more people that hear about preparedness, the better it will be for preppers in the long run.

 

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Prepper Website – Survival (@prepperwebsite) on

5. Share Your Own Preparedness 2020 Story.  Preppers who own websites aren’t the only ones that have a story to tell.  Every prepper has a story or stories that can help others better prepare, lessons to be learned.  For some examples, read – Ice Storm on the Farm and Bugout Before It’s Too Late!  If you have an article you would like to submit, CLICK HERE.

6. Don’t Let Your Website Disappear!  This one is specific for other preparedness website owners.  If you find yourself ready to stop writing preparedness content and you are planning on letting your website domain and hosting expire, please turn it over to someone that can keep it going for you.  I’m in talks with someone right now who is considering this.  Please don’t let your website just disappear.

Conclusion – Preparedness 2020

As we stand at the beginning of a new year, Preppers know that there are many unknowns.  The true believers will continue to prepare because it is a lifestyle and we care about taking responsibility for our families and loved ones.  I still expect that websites will go down in the middle of the night.  But I’m also hopeful that new preppers will rise to the challenge and become beacons of light in this world that seems to be getting darker.

Here’s to Preparedness 2020!  Do your part to make it a good one!

Peace,
Todd

 

Preppers 2020

 

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]]> https://www.edthatmatters.com/preparedness-2020/feed/ 21 My Prepper Bucket List – My Preparedness Story https://www.edthatmatters.com/prepper-bucket-list/ https://www.edthatmatters.com/prepper-bucket-list/#comments Mon, 30 Dec 2019 15:00:30 +0000 http://www.yourpreparednessstory.com/my-preparedness-story-part-i/   by Pam Baker A prepper bucket list doesn’t usually include Slicing the carotid artery of a chicken.  Neither was harvesting grain by hand or mucking out a poultry coop.  I grew up in suburbia, the great sprawling suburban/metropolis of the New York and Boston corridor. I am the child of hardworking folks who valued education and hoped I would follow suit.  My father was an Air Force mechanic and instilled in me many habits and ideas, the least of which is being ready for emergencies.  My mother was an industrial engineer and implanted the tenets of planning, persistence, and

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Prepper Bucket List

 

by Pam Baker

A prepper bucket list doesn’t usually include Slicing the carotid artery of a chicken.  Neither was harvesting grain by hand or mucking out a poultry coop.  I grew up in suburbia, the great sprawling suburban/metropolis of the New York and Boston corridor. I am the child of hardworking folks who valued education and hoped I would follow suit.  My father was an Air Force mechanic and instilled in me many habits and ideas, the least of which is being ready for emergencies.  My mother was an industrial engineer and implanted the tenets of planning, persistence, and perseverance.  On my own path, I learned much from hiking and backpacking with the American Youth Hostels and Appalachian Mountain Club.  First and foremost, never enter the woods unprepared.

More experience and education were acquired in my own military experience in the US Army; valuable medical training and later orienteering and survival.  I became an expert marksman with the M16A1 rifle.  I now know, some 30 years later, that although I could hit a target 300 yards away with great accuracy, I did not and still do not possess a working knowledge of using the weapon.  That IS on my prepper bucket list.

Beginnings of My Prepper Bucket List

I’d like to add that I grew up watching “The Waltons”.  I did not realize until some 20 odd years later how much that show impacted my psyche.  As I married and moved into adult life, I longed for a large house with a porch, chickens and for my in-laws to move in. My love for old trucks was obvious even then.

I tried to garden, which is hard to do in the high mountain desert of Colorado. I wanted six kids.  Okay, I didn’t want to birth six kids, but I wanted a large family.  This was not to be.  We lived our lives and had some food in the garage for emergencies but without any contingency plan.  It was a JIT (Just-In-Time) lifestyle.  We were mostly happy.

Nineteen years later, my husband and four dogs and three cats decided to move closer to family back east.  We found ourselves in southern Vermont and after a few months, ended up on in a rental that happened to be on 122 acres of forested and pasture land.  Suddenly, having chickens and cows and a big garden was something possible.  My prepper bucket list was being realized!

 

 

Just A Little Stubborn Checking Off the Bucket List

Our neighbor will tell you how pig-headed I am about doing things myself. So will some of my closest friends.  I don’t like to ask for help.  I like to be self-sufficient.  So, in the last 5 years on this land, we have had big gardens, learned to can food, process our own meat chickens and meat turkeys, grow grain, store food, and gather firewood to heat the home.  This process exposed us to many new thinking processes and overhauled our lifestyle. Leisure activities now involve hard work, sweat, dirt, poop, and a bountiful pantry. Our favorite saying now is: “A crappy day at farm chores is better than any day at a job.”

Our learning curve has been steep.  I was a generation removed from homesteading skills.  So I went on-line to learn and discovered my natural penchant to “always be prepared” and being self-sufficient led me to the prepping world and lifestyle.  I did fall into the doom and gloom mode for some time but have come to the realization that when you study history, civilizations rise and fall and economies boom and deflate. Natural disasters occur all the time everywhere.  Worrying about it doesn’t make it go away, come faster or make you better prepared.  It just takes years off your life. So I keep a toe or two in the water of the prepping world and another foot in homesteading/modern pioneering and continue with my prepper bucket list.

Lessons to Learn

We lost our first breeding trio of heritage turkeys the first year to an unknown predator one cold February morning. Lesson learned-although heritage turkeys do quite well without a structure to roost in, they cannot be protected from predators without one…build a coop. 

A massive tree landed on the garden early one June morning the next year. Lesson learned-examine the trees surrounding your structures and cull them as soon as weakness is discovered. 

The large cabinet incubator LED panel failed and so did over 90 of our turkey eggs. Lesson learned-sometimes buying stuff off Craigslist saves you money upfront, but costs you more in the end…be more cautious. 

Half an acre of grain can be relatively easy to grow but difficult to harvest.  Lesson learned-be better prepared. 

These lessons are why I call our blog The Homestead Experiment (website is no longer active). It may only be semantics to call it an experiment, but it’s my coping mechanism for those hard lessons to learn.

There is so much more to learn and to do.  Here are a few of our to-do’s or bucket list or whatever you may call it:

Even More Lessons

  • Build a proper barn
  • Get draft horses (took a local workshop last year and LOVE driving horses.)
  • Get cows, both milking and beef
  • Learn to handle milk and other dairy products safely and meet all our dairy needs
  • Grow and harvest all our grain and produce needs from our land for ourselves and our livestock
  • Learn to card and spin wool and flax
  • Increase our maple syrup production
  • Put in a proper herb (medicinal and culinary) garden
  • Learn to harvest ice
  • Improve weapon handling and self defense
  • Learn more permaculture methods

We have a ways to go to be self-sufficient.  Understandably, you cannot be completely self-sufficient without living a nomadic or highly primitive lifestyle.  There are things we cannot make for ourselves and so building a community is also one of our goals.

Our journey is just that…a journey.  We will succeed and fail at many things on our prepper bucket list and hopefully, some of our experiences will inspire or help someone else in their journey. 

 

Prepper Bucket List

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Prepper Lesson: Bugout Before It’s Too Late! https://www.edthatmatters.com/prepper-lesson-bugout/ https://www.edthatmatters.com/prepper-lesson-bugout/#comments Sat, 21 Dec 2019 16:03:06 +0000 https://www.edthatmatters.com/?p=34204 Knowing when to bugout has been the topic of many preparedness articles in the Prepper Community.  Many preppers have an idea of what should happen, but there is a real lack of experience.  However, when a fellow prepper shares a real-life experience, it is a great time for other preppers to learn from them and try to apply their lessons-learned to their life.  This article was written by D.B. and discusses his real bugout experience. Hello Todd, I’ve just recently gotten into the whole podcast scene and came across your podcasts. I was listening to a recent episode with Fernando

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bugout

Knowing when to bugout has been the topic of many preparedness articles in the Prepper Community.  Many preppers have an idea of what should happen, but there is a real lack of experience.  However, when a fellow prepper shares a real-life experience, it is a great time for other preppers to learn from them and try to apply their lessons-learned to their life.  This article was written by D.B. and discusses his real bugout experience.

Hello Todd, I’ve just recently gotten into the whole podcast scene and came across your podcasts. I was listening to a recent episode with Fernando Aguirre. It kinda hit me that I may have a bit of a unique situation that not only happened to me and my family but practically the whole town I live in. I’m from down the road from you in the Beaumont area. You undoubtedly heard about a chemical plant explosion in the sleepy town of Port Neches in the early morning hours of November 27th. That plant is less than ½ mile from my home. While the memories are relatively still fresh, I wanted to put into perspective a different kind of prepared, being “ill-prepared”.

 

 

Path to Preparedness Background

A little bit of background. In late 2014, I kinda came to the realization that simple hurricane preparedness, a few days of food and water, were not going to cut it. I started talking to my wife and sister about prepping and the reasons why. My wife and sister agreed and started doing their own research. I have other siblings that agree with some of my thoughts, but “prepping” isn’t cool or it’s too kooky to actually do.

Suffice to say my sister and my family spent a good amount of money and time in 2015 and 2016 building a little prepper stash at our respective homes. We had bug-out/bug-in plans and strategies on where we would go should we have to, the advantages and disadvantages of bugging in at our respective homes. By no means were we expert preppers, we barely stuck to the prepper lifestyle; rotating food, practicing bugout scenarios, learning useful skills, etc. I called myself a part-time prepper. I got the tools but barely knew how to use them and thought that was enough. Now on to the explosion.

 

 

A Boom and Reason to Bugout

The initial explosion had all of us in the house thinking it was lightning.  However, there were two differences that I initially noticed: there was no audible sound of thunder rolling away and the accompanying light with the “boom” was orange and not white. This left me confused in my sleepy state. I continued to listen for several seconds trying to determine if what I heard was real or my imagination. I heard numerous car alarms going off along with a large number of dogs barking. This was not normal in my neighborhood. I then noticed that the door to my A/C unit was wide open. I really knew there was something wrong then, but I continued to lay in bed listening for possible intruders along with still being confused as heck.

When I was confident that no intruders were in my house, I got up and got dressed and began to investigate. I noticed that there were pieces of insulation laying on the floor along with a cross, that had been hanging on the wall, was now laying on the ground. At this point, all I could still hear was car alarms and dogs, no sirens from first responders. One thing I noted while looking around my house was that I was physically shaking. I’m not entirely sure what caused that, probably an adrenaline dump. A few minutes after the initial explosion, I finally went outside.  The sky was lit up orange. Having grown up in this area my whole life, I knew that one of the plants had exploded. I could hear the flames roaring from my house.

Prepper Don’ts

Now for some of the stupid stuff, like many people in my town after being woken up by the blast, I wanted to be a looky-loo. I took off in my car to get a better view and maybe video or pics. Well so did practically everyone else in town. The roads were clogged with people along with a major thoroughfare being blocked to traffic for obvious reasons. I ended up a few streets over from my house in the neighborhood closest to the blast.  This was a really dumb move! People that lived on that street had a hard time leaving the immediate area due to us looky-loos. I was part of the problem and very stupidly so. After talking to family members, making sure they were ok, I headed home.

About 12 hours after the initial blast there was a second explosion, well there was actually more but officially there were only 2 major explosions. I was in my home watching updates when we heard a significant “boom”. I told my family that secondary explosions are to be expected. Shortly after there was another larger “boom” than the one before, enough that it rattled our house. I then did the complete opposite of what one should do, I went outside while my family went to the windows. There was black smoke where there had been light gray before. I told my family to start packing.

Prepper Panic

This is where panic set in on my family members. We were running around, scrambling trying to get clothes from both dressers and the laundry room while trying to think of things to get other than clothes i.e. hygiene items, pet care items. I had to tell my wife to slow down, take your time and just make sure we are ready to go if we need to. I had to comfort my son since he was kinda freaking out and scared by the explosion, plus the live feed of the explosion that had just occurred.

The second explosion jettisoned a piece of a tower 200-300 feet in the air. Officially it was hinted that the tower landed in an empty field and away from storage tanks.  However, my brother is a firefighter and helped work the fire as part of the area hazmat team. He showed me on google maps where the tower actually landed.  If it had landed mere feet in either direction, it would not have been good. It just happened to land in the space between two storage tanks that could contain any of a number of flammable/explosive chemicals.

RELATED: The Bugout Formula – If You Have to Ask Yourself, It’s Already Too Late!

Mandatory Evacuations

Not long after the second explosion, the county judge ordered a mandatory evacuation. This evac included the tri-city area along with parts of a 4th city to the south of us and parts of unincorporated areas just north of our town. I have to kinda explain a bit about my family’s “emergency plan”. When my sister and I began our prepping duties, our mother was still alive, fragile but still alive. So obviously she could not bug out should SHTF, so our plans not only revolved around our mother and bugging in as the main option, but also my in-laws who are also not as mobile as we are. However, this evac included all of our homes; my home, my sister’s home and my in-laws’ home. All 3 of our homes were considered part of our bugout or bug-in plans. We had no actual bug out location outside of our area. We could try to get a hotel, but so were about 50,000 other residents. After some time, the final solution was that we would evac to my brother’s girlfriend’s family. They live about an hour north of us.

From the time the evac was ordered and several frantic calls from my sister, my brother and my in-laws, the time it took to figure out where we were going to go, if we should take animals, etc., it took more than 4 hours to actually get on the road. The evac was ordered around 230 pm but we had actually started packing and gathering things before this. We were not on the road till well after 630pm. Ultimately, we were out of our homes for 4 days.

Bugout Lessons Learned

Some of the takeaways from this event:
a) There are no part-time preppers, you’re either prepared or you’re not. I was NOT prepared.
b) Practice, practice, practice.
c) If you can, a bug-out location with living quarters is the way to go. This event has renewed my resolve to own some land out in the middle of nowhere with proper living quarters.
d) If a bug-out location is not possible, then proper plans need to be in place. Your prepping plans should be looked at and updated regularly.
e) Leave early! Realistically we should have left earlier in the day before the evac was ordered, but I had developed a laissez-faire attitude towards not only prepping in general but the entire situation at hand.
f) Don’t be a looky-loo! You’re only in the way of not only people needing to evac the immediate area but also responding emergency personnel. I only realized this when I was almost plowed into by a resident who was frantically trying to evac their home which was very close to the explosion.

Best,
D.B.

Do you have a “Prepper Lesson” story or experience you would like to share?  Send it to todd [dot] sepulveda [@] prepperwebsite [dot] com.

RELATED: Using A Shed As A Bugout Hut: Being Stealthy, Stocking It and More

 

Prepper Lesson Series - Bugout

 

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]]> https://www.edthatmatters.com/prepper-lesson-bugout/feed/ 1 Prepper Lesson: Ice Storm on the Farm https://www.edthatmatters.com/prepper-lesson-winter/ https://www.edthatmatters.com/prepper-lesson-winter/#comments Mon, 16 Dec 2019 01:13:31 +0000 https://www.edthatmatters.com/?p=34199 It is always a great idea when members of the Preparedness Community share their experiences with others, a prepper lesson.  We can learn from others, from their successes and mistakes.  And many preppers would be surprised that what seems to be a regular life to them, helps others understand some aspect of preparedness.  This article is provided by MaryLou who shares about her experience going through an ice storm on her farm with her husband and some of the adjustments they had to make to get through it. I grew up in a home where my mom had a pantry,

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It is always a great idea when members of the Preparedness Community share their experiences with others, a prepper lesson.  We can learn from others, from their successes and mistakes.  And many preppers would be surprised that what seems to be a regular life to them, helps others understand some aspect of preparedness.  This article is provided by MaryLou who shares about her experience going through an ice storm on her farm with her husband and some of the adjustments they had to make to get through it.

I grew up in a home where my mom had a pantry, mainly just basics and included her canned foods. It wasn’t in abundance, but it was adequate for us since we lived in a small town. We also had an oil space heater for the house and a propane stove for cooking. When the power went off it mainly affected the television, the refrigerator, and the freezer. When the plugin clock started to move or the frig started to run, then we knew the power was back.

I married a farmer and we lived about 20 miles from the nearest town. If we ran out of something, we couldn’t just jump in the car and go to town. We needed a plan. I also had a pantry, a freezer and fortunately a propane stove.

 

Prepper Lesson – Ice Storm Adjustments

One Winter, we had an ice storm on the farm. The main heat for the two-bedroom trailer was a propane kitchen stove, leaving the oven open and having the oven on at a moderate temperature because the propane furnace won’t kick in without electric.  We shut off the hallway with blankets. We used the toilet, but we had to harvest the ice, melt it on the stove and use buckets only for solids. Two mattresses were placed on the front room floor and we had two oil lamps plus candles put in bowls for the time we were awake but we snuffed them out when we went to bed. Flashlights were used if the toilet was needed during the night.  Prepper Lesson: It’s easier to heat a smaller room.  

My husband was able to use the hand pump with the jack pump.  Sometimes, we would get water from the neighbors, where it was easier to pump.

Dishes were done using pans. This water was saved for flushing the toilet. To run it through the lines might cause the lines to freeze.  Prepper Lesson: Find ways to reuse and recycle everything that is possible.

Three meals had to be done before sunset, so we could see in the limited light to cook the food and do the dishes. Food from the frig was placed in containers and set out on the porch. Freezer items were placed in a plastic barrel, covered, placed outside and covered with snow, so the only waste was the container of ice cream.  Prepper Lesson: Sometimes you need to think outside of the “box” or the refrigerator.

At that time, we didn’t have cell phones.  We only had landlines. But, we were fortunate to have phone service. Those lines didn’t go down.

Our situation lasted for almost four days, but there were some areas that suffered for almost two weeks! We were fortunate.  Prepper Lesson: Someone has it worse than you.

I still have a pantry, but I don’t have a propane stove now and I want one. I have been slowly buying what I call odds and ends, candles from the second-hand stores, garage sales, and collecting anything that might have a purpose or be repurposed.  Prepper Lesson: Preparedness is a lifestyle, a mentality.  You should always find ways to better your situation.

Do you have a prepper lesson that you can share about winter?  Please feel free to share your thoughts in the comment section below.

RELATED: Surviving the Disaster in California – Important Lessons Learned

 

Prepper Lesson - Winter - Pin

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]]> https://www.edthatmatters.com/prepper-lesson-winter/feed/ 1 Pipelines in the US When SHTF – Could They Be An Option? https://www.edthatmatters.com/pipelines-in-the-us/ https://www.edthatmatters.com/pipelines-in-the-us/#comments Sun, 03 Nov 2019 22:58:02 +0000 https://www.edthatmatters.com/?p=34182 In a true longterm grid-down scenario, those who are prepared with the right tools might have the opportunity to provide their family or group with much-needed fuel for survival.  This article will cover the basics of how a system of pipelines in the US can be identified and accessed with little information and the right tools. First, I must say that under normal circumstances we should never, ever tamper with any type of oil and gas equipment, pipeline or facilities. There is a high risk that one could inadvertently cause a system shutdown, an explosion, or a multi-million dollar product

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Pipelines in the US

In a true longterm grid-down scenario, those who are prepared with the right tools might have the opportunity to provide their family or group with much-needed fuel for survival.  This article will cover the basics of how a system of pipelines in the US can be identified and accessed with little information and the right tools.

First, I must say that under normal circumstances we should never, ever tamper with any type of oil and gas equipment, pipeline or facilities. There is a high risk that one could inadvertently cause a system shutdown, an explosion, or a multi-million dollar product release that could endanger lives and property. This includes pipelines, pump or compressor stations, valve settings, etc. Everything that flows through wellheads, pipelines, or refineries, will in some way kill you!

AN SHTF FUEL OPTION

Pipelines in the USBut in the event that there has been a longterm SHTF or TEOTWAWKI event, and the refineries are no longer manned by their operations staff, or the field equipment is no longer being maintained and controlled, things will begin to fail on our oil and gas systems. And most products will eventually stop flowing.

If no fuel is being refined, then eventually there will be nothing to be trucked to gas stations. That is if gas stations are even still operational. I am in no way suggesting that anyone (especially someone who has no knowledge of what they are messing with) tamper with or attempt to remove anything from oil and gas locations or out of pipelines, even if they are out of operation. But it will inevitably begin to happen if things ever fall apart and remain in shambles for very long. So this article is intended to bring to light a few things that should be considered for safety.

REFINERIES

Our major refineries are a very valuable resource, not only to the companies that own and operate them, but important to our nation on many different levels. There is a good reason that refineries all over the world become military targets during wartime.  The reason is the loss of oil and gas production and/or refining capabilities is one of the fastest ways to cripple an enemy nation. Therefore, regardless of the level of the disaster facing our country, at least some of these facilities will no doubt be guarded by the military, private security, or someone. So looting of any type, in or around both coastal and inland refineries could prove to be fatal. Also, the more these facilities are impacted by looting and damage during a shutdown of the type I’m talking about, the more difficult it will be and longer it will take to bring the facility back online when life begins to return to normal.

PIPELINES IN THE US

Crude oil, natural gas, refined gasoline, refined diesel, propane, and water are just a few of the products that flow through pipelines all over the world. But the few listed here, in my opinion, will be the most sought after during a long term disaster event. And even after refineries, cryogenic plants, liquid pump stations, and compressor stations have stopped operating to move these products, the products will remain in the pipelines. Most pipelines do have several points along its route where a valve setting or other type of riser comes up above ground, that someone could open up to collect some of the product inside. But anyone who attempts this should know that there is a very high probability that the pipeline still contains very high pressures, even though the pumps might not be operational. Anything like propane or natural gas in its gaseous state would require specialized fittings and equipment in order to capture the product into propane tanks or any similar container. These fittings could possibly be purchased from a propane distributor or online. Liquid pipelines such as crude oil, gasoline, diesel or natural gas liquids could be removed from above-ground valves with the proper pipe fittings and a fuel hose.

IDENTIFYING PIPELINES

OSHA and several state agencies mandate the proper marking and signage of pipelines and their products in the United States. The pipeline is required to have a “pipeline marker” that includes the name and contact information of the company who owns or operates the line and/or it’s contents. The markers must be placed at a specific distance from each other for the entire length of the pipeline. The pipeline markers are then required to be color-coded to signify the product inside. For example, a yellow marker indicates a natural gas line, purple is usually marking produced water that comes from oil wells (which is absolutely not drinkable.) Blue markers indicate freshwater, red markers could either indicate a fire suppressing liquid (like what’s inside a fire hydrant) or it could be marking electricity. Colors may vary a bit from place to place but the color-coding system is supposed to be international. To find out more about the color-coding system in your area, there are several online resources. One being your state’s one call system.

WELL PADS/WELL HEADS

Pipelines in the USThis is where all things oil and gas begin. At a well that has been drilled hundreds or thousands of feet into the ground. Pipe has then been inserted into the hole and so on. Again, everything on a well pad or production location will almost always have pressure behind it, everything will hurt or kill you. Most of these locations only have either crude oil or raw natural gas. Most production locations also have automated metering equipment that is powered by a 12v car battery connected to a solar panel. ( …..just saying……do what you will with that info 🙂

This automation usually only serves the purpose of sending information to a main network somewhere else about how much the well produced that day. Usually this isn’t necessary to the well or entire system coming back online after it has been down. Occasionally, the automation can control an electronic valve that can be operated remotely and will affect the operation of the entire system if removed or damaged.

On an oil production location, there are normally large tanks that store crude oil and in another tank, the produced water. All tanks are supposed to be properly labeled. These tanks also contain flammable vapor and have the possibility to contain poisonous gasses like hydrogen sulfide that will kill you.

MAKING PLANS NOW

If the removal of products from any of the places I’ve named becomes necessary, and if you’re reading this, then you must believe that day could come. Then you should consider making a plan now as to where you will remove product from and make sure you have the proper fittings and hoses to do so. The proper fittings will make it much safer than something thrown together out of junk laying around.

You should also consider wearing goggles, chemical gloves, and Tyvek suits if possible, or some type of chemical apron. Anything that will keep oil and other liquids out of your eyes, mouth and off of your skin and clothing. Never, under any circumstances should you try to knock a hole in any type of pipe or oil and gas equipment to collect what is inside. This could result in you taking several hundred pounds of liquid or gas pressure to the face and/or starting a fire with more pressure behind it than you can get away from.

Again, I’m not writing this to explain how to remove products that could be used in a disaster situation, ( even though this would be a great source for obtaining lots of fuel after gas stations are empty) nor do I condone doing so. But if things get bad enough for long enough, it is inevitable that people will begin to do this very thing. Hopefully, if that person ends up being you who read this article, you gained a bit of knowledge about how to do it safely.

This is a guest post by Derek Hayes.

Pipelines in the US when the SHTF

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]]> https://www.edthatmatters.com/pipelines-in-the-us/feed/ 10 Emergency Carry When Your Job Keeps You On the Road https://www.edthatmatters.com/preppers-emergency-carry/ https://www.edthatmatters.com/preppers-emergency-carry/#comments Sun, 27 Oct 2019 19:33:57 +0000 https://www.edthatmatters.com/?p=34175 I travel for work. For months at a time, I could be anywhere between 50 and 1500 miles from home. There are many different situations that I could face on a day to day basis while traveling through or working in an unknown area. Obviously the situation changes from place to place and because of this, there are several things I carry that most people probably wouldn’t include in a typical emergency bag. My “get home bags” are a bit bulky and some would say illogical. There are preparations that I have in place to get me home, or through any

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Emergency Carry

I travel for work. For months at a time, I could be anywhere between 50 and 1500 miles from home. There are many different situations that I could face on a day to day basis while traveling through or working in an unknown area. Obviously the situation changes from place to place and because of this, there are several things I carry that most people probably wouldn’t include in a typical emergency bag. My “get home bags” are a bit bulky and some would say illogical. There are preparations that I have in place to get me home, or through any foreseeable situation. Of course, there are too many possible scenarios to name here, but I wanted to share a few specific things for others who travel frequently to consider.

I guess I should say, I don’t necessarily try to prepare for every scenario that could possibly happen on the road or while I’m away from home because that would be near impossible. I plan for three or four scenarios that somewhat overlap to cover multiple needs and possible events. I try to stay prepared for any area-specific crime issues. The possibility of having to wait out a storm or disaster type situation while in a strange place for an unknown period of time with limited resources. And also the possibility of having to get home to my family from halfway across the country, with or without motorized travel.

Understanding Crime On the Road

Let’s first explore the area-specific crime issues. First off, as Machiavelli said, “before all else, be armed”. And as we all know, different states have different gun laws, so be aware of them. But always be armed with something. One of the best things I think you can do is look up crime statistics for the area you will be working or staying in. This should give you an idea of the most likely things to look out for. And obviously, situational awareness becomes so much more important when in a place you’ve never been before.

There are several good resources online for checking statistics, but as I’ve heard Todd talk about on the podcast, all crime isn’t always reported to certain agencies. It’s a good idea to check more than one place for crime stats and specific threats. I know that this can seem like a simple thing to be prepared for, but from experience, the southern border of Texas presents different risks to personal safety than Kansas City, Chicago or places on the East Coast and vice versa. It’s usually a good idea to know what to expect before you arrive. And I personally add region-specific preps to my bags before leaving home.

How to Check Your Vehicle for “Markers”

Again from experience, before getting into my vehicle anywhere, I walk around it and check things like tires and lug nuts to ensure that someone hasn’t removed a few lug nuts or loosened them so I end up on the side of the road in a less populated area that is potentially better suited for a robbery. I check to make sure that my vehicle hasn’t been visibly marked somehow that could be an indicator as to which white Chevy pickup or blue minivan to break into later or carjack at the next red light. A seemingly random spot wiped clean on the tailgate or trunk, or maybe a piece of tape on a taillight or headlight could indicate a vehicle with valuables inside. Or it could mark a “soft target”, a person disabled or otherwise unlikely to put up much fight. It could be marking the specific red ford car that has a mother and two children who are being targeted by human traffickers. Things like this are why it’s important to be as unpredictable with your schedule as possible while in unfamiliar places or even in your hometown. But just do a quick check frequently enough to notice something out of place. I could go on with these types of scenarios all day, but for the sake of the length of this article, I will move on to number two.

Emergency Carry When You Need to Hunker Down On the Road

The second thing I wanted to share ideas for is having to hunker down for an extended period of time in a motel room or a vehicle. I travel and room alone, therefore I rent a single bed hotel room. Upon check-in, I ask where the single rooms are located within the facility and request the room with the best tactical advantage ( closest to exits, the best view of the surrounding area, etc.) I also park where I can see the window to my room from my vehicle because then I can obviously see my vehicle from inside my room. I carry a Water Bob bladder in my clothing bag, which for those who don’t know, is a collapsible 75 or 100-gallon plastic container similar to a water bed bladder that goes in a bathtub to hold water. In the event of a power outage or when a big, bad storm is incoming and “bugging out” for home is either not possible or not yet necessary, I fill the water bob as soon as I can to ensure I have an ample supply of water. This next one is pretty simple, I always keep several dollars in quarters for vending machines, provided the electricity remains on while taking shelter at my hotel. Plenty of books and entertainment that doesn’t require a power source is always a good idea. In my opinion, the actual plans and preparations aren’t anywhere close to as important as the mindset of “I’m on my own and willing to do what I have to in order to survive whatever comes”.

Emergency Carry When You Need to Get Back Home

Prepper Emergency CarryThe third thing I plan for is, as I said, having to get home from a great distance. Obviously, if vehicles are working, fuel supply and trucking aren’t interrupted and roads are passable, then this wouldn’t be too big of a problem. But take one or all of those off the table and things get complicated.

I have a 100-gallon auxiliary fuel tank in the back of my pickup. It will take me a long distance without worrying about fuel. The pump that is mounted in the tank to pump fuel from the tank to the vehicle has a hose and nozzle like a typical fuel pump at a gas station, and will also suck fuel from something else and into the tank with a simple reversal of the wires on the battery. I also carry another way to siphon fuel and a small inline fuel pump that clips to a car battery. I print area-specific maps of my location and route home as soon as I get to my destination.

Related: EDC for Regular People and Then Some! The One Item You’ll Go Back Home For!

Carry Various Emergency Carry Bags 

As I said, I carry more than one emergency bag. I have a large bag that is your basic bug out type setup, except it has more volume of the normal items. A small tent and several types of water gathering/purification devices are also included along with a case of emergency water that I do not drink from.

I carry a bag containing a medical kit that I have assembled to fit my needs. It will give any paramedic response bag a run for its money. Not only do I work in very remote locations far away from home where cell service can be rare, but I have also encountered numerous car wrecks and other emergency situations in traveling between jobs or traveling to and from home. It also has road flares, light sticks and a fire rescue hood that all have multiple uses. There are several smoke grenades needed for wind direction and signaling when a medevac helicopter is inbound. A neck brace, folding stretcher, large burn gel pads and lots of other items.

Then there is the gun bag. I usually carry two pistols of varying concealability in the bag (and of course one on my person). A bolt action. 308, and an AR-15. I keep a couple of hundred rounds of ammo for each and plenty of extra mags with me too.

Now you might be thinking, “why does this goofball carry so much stuff, there’s no way one or even two people could carry all of that over 500+ miles if needed”.

Emergency Carry When There is No Vehicle

I carry with all of the other stuff, a modified, folding jogging stroller. This is the kind that has three large all-terrain type wheels similar to bicycle wheels. It has been modified to carry most of my stuff. And in the event that I have to walk home, the items I deem unnecessary for the specific type of emergency I encounter, I plan to either trade-off or I will leave behind. Walmart also sells a couple of different variations of folding wagons and carts for a relatively low price.

With the back seat of my pickup folded up, my two bags, gun case, folding cart and case of emergency water all stack and fit neatly into an area that covers a bit less than half the floor space on the back passenger side. This leaves plenty of room for bags containing all of my clothing and other luggage. In the back of my pickup is the auxiliary fuel tank, a large toolbox and a large cooler containing other drinks and more water. I carry a variety of tools and different items.

While this volume of stuff may not be an option for everyone, hopefully, I have at least given someone a few things to think about. I am under no illusions that potentially packing my equipment hundreds of miles in a modified jogging stroller will be easy. My plans aren’t perfect, but for my specific needs and career in the pipeline industry, where the only thing that’s for sure is that nothing is for sure, this works for me. My preparations, whether while traveling or my stockpiles at home are ever-changing. It’s an ongoing process of stocking and restocking and figuring out ways to better prepare myself, my family and those around me. The world around us is dynamic, our preparations, as well as our mindset should be too!

However you prepare, don’t become so rigid in it that you can’t redirect and move in another direction if needed.

This is a guest post by Derek Hayes.

Preppers Emergency Carry

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]]> https://www.edthatmatters.com/preppers-emergency-carry/feed/ 6 Survival Skills: Learning from Insurgent Tactics https://www.edthatmatters.com/survival-skills/ https://www.edthatmatters.com/survival-skills/#comments Sun, 06 Oct 2019 22:24:38 +0000 https://www.edthatmatters.com/?p=34150   For those that like to maintain a state of readiness to deal with uncertain times, it’s important to maintain a steady, regular supply of clean water, food, first aid, tools and survival skills. If you’ve ever watched the show “Doomsday Preppers”, you’ll likely see that there are quite a few people who have their own ideas about how to survive a catastrophic scenario – aka SHTF. One thing you may notice from that show, as well, is many rely on static compounds. While that is one strategy, we’re going to explore another. There are a few life lessons we

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Survival Skills

 

For those that like to maintain a state of readiness to deal with uncertain times, it’s important to maintain a steady, regular supply of clean water, food, first aid, tools and survival skills. If you’ve ever watched the show “Doomsday Preppers”, you’ll likely see that there are quite a few people who have their own ideas about how to survive a catastrophic scenario – aka SHTF. One thing you may notice from that show, as well, is many rely on static compounds.

While that is one strategy, we’re going to explore another.

There are a few life lessons we can take to heart from none other than watching how insurgents evaded NATO and US forces in Afghanistan.

Survival Skills – Lessons from Insurgent Tactics

There’s not too much to love about the Taliban. This article is NOT advocating them in any way, shape or form. Ruthless, cunning, and deceptive, they have managed to survive and thwart efforts to be stamped out by US forces throughout more than ten years of active pursuit.

The best military in the world could never, even at their height, completely eliminate their activity. How did the Taliban and their allies manage to evade capture so well?

“Strategically Placed Supply Caches – A Survival Skill to Learn”

No man can survive for more than three to four days without fresh water. Nor can he fight without ammunition or some form of food.

Taliban Survival Skills - Cache

Photo by Spc. Justin Young – “The appearance of U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) visual information does not imply or constitute DoD endorsement.”

 

When US forces discovered these caches, they would often either destroy in place or attempt to collect intelligence from them. But one thing was extremely apparent – the Taliban never put all their eggs in one basket. And if you’re developing plans to survive in the event of a disaster, neither should you.

Castles Fall, Plans Change, and Survivors Move Fast

Unless you personally have a small army with its own independent supply of ammunition and arms, you can never assume any defensive fortification you hold – be it home, improvised structure, or bedrock-built castle – will hold for any length of time.

Why?  Because you need to sleep.  Outside of water, the only thing human beings can’t do without for three to four days is sleep.

More importantly, your survival skills in a true survival situation are:

  • evacuating to a safer location.
  • ensuring that fresh supplies are available to rebuild.
  • assuring catastrophic loses to your pursuers.

Iron-reinforced walls, embankments, brick and mortar fortifications, sandbags, and overlapping fields of fire are all very well and good.  But, again, without personnel to man those walls – the only purpose of them is to delay and resist an enemy advancing upon you.

Good News – Survival IS Cheap; Obtaining Survival Skills are Too!

Vietnam Survival Skills

*”Vietnam War 1968 – Urges” by manhhai is licensed under CC BY 2.0

Historically, take a look at any military force that has had to resist a much stronger, better-equipped one.

Whether it be the North Vietnamese in 1967 or the Taliban in 2007 or the Sinoloa Cartel in Northern Mexico, the same core principles always apply.

  • Stay light
  • Stay fast
  • Never put all your eggs in one basket

You don’t need multi-million dollar complexes, advanced sensor technology, or even the best arms and munitions to pull this off.  You just need to understand your needs, your family’s needs, and not be afraid to put in plenty of sweat capital.

Here’s what all three guerilla forces employed as their main modes of movement for short distances: tunnels, caches, and spider holes.

Tunnels, Caches, and Spider Holes

The tunnels only need to be big enough to crawl through and they’re only meant to get you from one position to another without being harassed.  Reinforce with wood or, ideally, non-corrosive materials.

Spider holes are also another survival skill that is great for keeping you and some supplies off the beaten path.  They can sometimes even store more than just you for really short amounts of time.

Never put more into a spider hole than you’re willing to lose.  Always mark the location in some distinct way that only you would identify and understand.

 

 

Caches can be big or small stores of essential emergency items such as medical supplies, food, water, tools, and ammunition.  They can double as short-term safe houses or spider holes. The basic rule of thumb: the bigger the cache, the more you have to haul.

Plan multiple routes and place caches along those routes.  If you take Route A versus Route B, you may have the opportunity to double back and collect some of those items.  In a survival situation, whenever it is feasible to take all supplies with you and leave nothing behind – that’s what you should do.  Don’t leave anything behind to help your pursuers.

Seal food, water, and ammunition in plastic and, ideally, metal containers.  Apply light squirts of vinegar across the exterior of the container to mask your individual smell.

I have found a 2-liter plastic soda bottle that is just the right size to fit inside one of my standard caching tubes so I always make the center tube of the cache (the one that I hopefully find first) my drinking water cache. If you shop around you will find that you can locate cans just the right size to fit your caching tubes. This, of course, assumes that you want to cache over the counter foods in cans and plan on rotating your stores on a regular basis. There is a lot to be said for emergency rations being the same foods you are used to eating in a non-emergency situation. There is no “shock” to your digestive tract (nobody needs a case of diarrhea or constipation at a time like this ) by eating all freeze-dried trail food (or other emergency rations) all of a sudden instead of your normal diet. You can also cache items that are not your ordinary emergency foods in caches, such as canned meats, chicken, fish, etc. if using and rotating standard canned foods. This will help you plan and keep a balanced diet. SOURCE – Your Survival Cache Pt. 3

And remember: survival in an SHTF situation depends more on mobility than it does on fortification.  No fortification lasts forever and no one can run forever. Find the perfect balance!

 

About the Author: Bobby Norman is an avid blogger with particular interests in guns and shooting.

 

Cache

*“Vietnam War 1968 – Urges”by manhhai is licensed under CC BY 2.0

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]]> https://www.edthatmatters.com/survival-skills/feed/ 2 An Alternative Power Source for Preppers https://www.edthatmatters.com/an-alternative-power-source-for-preppers/ https://www.edthatmatters.com/an-alternative-power-source-for-preppers/#comments Thu, 03 Oct 2019 01:00:22 +0000 https://www.edthatmatters.com/?p=34136   Unless you’re sleeping, being in the dark is never fun!  This multiplies when you have a family and especially young children who are scared of the dark.  Then, throw in an emergency situation (insert one here) and you have a recipe for frustration, anxiety, and uncertainty.  Times like these is when having an alternative power source is a game-changer. Many at this point will think of gas or even a dual-fuel generator.  But what do you do when the fuel runs out?  What if you could have an alternative power source that was fueled by a renewable resource: the

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Unless you’re sleeping, being in the dark is never fun!  This multiplies when you have a family and especially young children who are scared of the dark.  Then, throw in an emergency situation (insert one here) and you have a recipe for frustration, anxiety, and uncertainty.  Times like these is when having an alternative power source is a game-changer.

Many at this point will think of gas or even a dual-fuel generator.  But what do you do when the fuel runs out?  What if you could have an alternative power source that was fueled by a renewable resource: the sun?  For preppers and non-preppers alike, the EcoFlow River and its big brother, the EcoFlow Delta are strong considerations when it comes to providing power for your home, outing or emergency situation when you need it!

The EcoFlow River is a powerful alternative power source that allows you to power up to 9 devices at one time.  The huge battery and display allows you to power many devices while knowing how long the battery can actually power the device.  This is great because it takes all calculations and guessing out of the situation and provides a display that even a Third-grader can understand!

To give you an example of what the EcoFlow River can do as an alternative power source, here is a list of some items it can power and for how long.

Communication Devices

  • Phone(10 Wh): 37+ Times
  • Tablet(30 Wh): 12+ Times
  • Laptop(65 Wh): 6+ Times

Recreational Gear

  • GoPro(5 Wh): 74+ Times
  • Camera(16 Wh): 22+ Times
  • Drone(60-70 Wh): 5-6 Times
  • Mini-Fridge(60 W): 6 Hours

Household Appliances

  • Light(100 W): 4+ Hours
  • Fan(18 W): 20+ Hours
  • Wifi Router(12-15 W): 25-31 Hours
  • Electric Drill(100-150 Wh): 3-4 Times
  • CPAP(40 W): 9 Hours

The EcoFlow River is a sleek, lightweight power source that can be charged by an AC outlet, 12v connection or even solar panels.  Having solar panels allows you to charge the River regardless of where you are!

The Ecoflow River can easily charge battery powered tools so you can fix and repair needed items during an emergency situation.  Notice the display.  The River is completely charged at 100%.  The 99 is the number of hours it can charge with the current load, which at this time is nothing.  The 99 basically means that nothing is connected.

 

Here you see the EcoFlow River after completely charging the DeWalt Battery and the USB charged Headlamp.  It is still at 65% and 99 again since both devices are now fully charged.

 

This is the back of the River.  The back has two AC plugs and one 12v plug.  If you are using the River,’s AC plugs you have to push the button to activate the backside of the battery.  The front has USB and USB-C slots.

 

Charging the EcoFlow River off the grid is easy with the 85w solar panels.

 

The River fits behind the solar panels to shield it from the sun and elements when it is charging.

 

 

 

 

For more information about the EcoFlow River and solar panels, visit the EcoFlow website – CLICK HERE.

 

But the EcoFlow River is not the only alternative power source you should consider!  EcoFlow has just released the bigger, more powerful version called the Delta.  They have recently debuted the Delta on KICKSTARTER and it was fully funded in the first day!  That is a true testament to how people feel about what EcoFlow is doing!

 

 

To check out the EcoFlow Delta KICKSTARTER page – CLICK HERE.

 

Peace,
Todd

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